T-Party loses over £40k

Figures from Telford & Wrekin Council show that we underestimated the amount of our money Telford & Wrekin Council lost on the T-Party event.

We expected a loss on the concert of about £17,500 based on the shortfall in the number of people going to the concert against what the council told the Shropshire Star they needed to break even but they actually lost £27,484 on the concert and a further £12,874 on the previous weekend’s “children’s festival”.  This makes a total loss of £40,358.

It is extremely concerning that the leader of Telford & Wrekin Council, Cllr Kuldip Sahota, considers this such a success that he has pledged to repeat it next year.  Cllr Bill McClements, the council’s money man, told BBC Radio Shropshire that he would have been happy to lose £30k of our money on the concert.  Whether he’s happy to have lost £40k is unknown at the moment but as the council has been considering rationing care services “because of The Cuts” you’d hope the answer would be no.  Then again, you’d expect the man whose job it is to balance the books when the council’s income is being drastically reduced to against the idea of losing money on anything, let alone a pop concert.

The Conservatives have failed to hold the Labour-run council to account for wasting so much taxpayers’ money thus far and have remained silent since the full extent of the losses have been known.  We can only assume they are happy to see services cut to pay for a pop concert and that they have given up all pretence of opposition to this wasteful Labour regime.  Residents can be assured that we will continue to provide the only opposition to Labour in Telford & Wrekin and hold both Labour and the Conservatives to account for their actions.

Hat-tip to Callam Delaney for the FOI response.

Posted in Telford News
16 comments on “T-Party loses over £40k
  1. Matthew Hughes says:

    The BBC spends a fortune of “our” money on concerts at a great loss and you’re moaning because they decided to do something similar that can only have helped publicise Telford and even with this “bad press” via the FOI it will of course give more publicity to next years event.
    I hope next years event does go ahead and they break even just so you can pipe down. I imagine those that attended had a good time and its about time the government spent money on something that makes people happy instead of wasting it on rubbish.

    Thanks
    Matt

  2. Andrew Ridely says:
    Admin Comment: Multiple comments using different names have been posted from this IP address

    The cultural sector creates economic growth and jobs; it is one of the fastest-growing in the economy. Continued public funding is vital to the whole sector, giving confidence to sponsors and private investors.

    Arts and culture are relatively cheap to support, and bring big returns. The current investment is 14p per person per week; equal to less than 0.05 per cent of total government spending.

    For every £1 invested in the arts it generates a return of £6 into the economy.

    Cultural events bring communities together and make our lives richer; we saw this in action at the 2012 Olympic opening ceremony, which drew on talent fostered by public investment.

    Figures online here:-
    http://www.artscouncil.org.uk/what-we-do/advocacy/economy-infographic/

    and also here
    http://www.artscouncil.org.uk/what-we-do/advocacy/investment-infograhic/

    By the sounds of your answers on the Shropshire Star website you have access to an economic impact study of the event perhaps you could say where you got your data and answers from and using which econonic impact framework you used to get them:-

    “So the big corporations who own the bars and restaurants and hotels around the town centre might have made a few quid extra over those few days and some of them might have employed an extra temporary worker for a few days but where’s the investment in Telford? Has the value of their property increased as a result of it? No, so the council won’t get higher business rates. Has it created any jobs? No, so unemployment hasn’t been cut. Were local companies used to run the event? No, so very little of the money spent went into the local economy. Has Telford’s profile been increased positively?”

    • If this cultural event generated a 600% return on investment then that means the £272,655 the council gambled on this loss-making concert will have resulted in a £1,635,930. That’s quite an impressive return on a 4 day event, can you give us some idea of where we’re going to see the benefit of this £1.6m return on investment and which of the beneficiaries are likely to pay back the £40k loss the council made for their benefit?

  3. Nancy Evans says:
    Admin Comment: Multiple comments using different names have been posted from this IP address

    Arts and culture because they have the power to nurture and inspire us, to ask questions and pose challenges, whether as a society or as individuals. The contribution culture makes to our quality of life and its ability to fire our imaginations always comes first.

    According to Centre for Economics and Business Research (CEBR):-

    Arts and culture is a sector of significant scale with a turnover of £12.4 billion and a GVA of £5.9 billion in 2011

    Arts and culture generate more per pound invested than the health, wholesale and retail, and professional and business services sectors.

    At least £856 million per annum of spending by tourists visiting the UK can be attributed directly to arts and culture

    The role of the arts and culture in underpinning the commercial
    creative industries and suggests that public funding of the arts and culture can play a vital role in encouraging creative innovation.

    We know from the transformation of Liverpool’s town centre since it was Capital of Culture in 2008, and the regeneration of places like Folkestone and Margate through their cultural quarters, that the arts can transform places.

    It surely makes sense now for many Local Enterprise Partnerships and Local Authorities to be thinking about how investment in culture can promote their own sense of place, and in doing so to make them stand out as attractive places to live, work and invest.

    So what are you doing for Brookside to get this extra and new investment for our community to change people lives and inspire our next generation?

    • Arts and culture because they have the power to nurture and inspire us, to ask questions and pose challenges, whether as a society or as individuals

      No argument there but if you ask the 500 or so people a month that are relying on the food bank to feed them whether they’d rather be nurtured and inspired or eat they’d probably choose the latter.

      It surely makes sense now for many Local Enterprise Partnerships and Local Authorities to be thinking about how investment in culture can promote their own sense of place, and in doing so to make them stand out as attractive places to live, work and invest.

      Yes it does – places like museums, the World Heritage Site, etc. Places that bring in tourists and outside investment on a regular basis, create permanent jobs and bring people back for repeat visits. The only part of the four day T-Live event that had wide enough appeal to bring people in from outside the area was the McFly concert and that was one night only and lost the most money.

      So what are you doing for Brookside to get this extra and new investment for our community to change people lives and inspire our next generation?

      Our councillors in Brookside have supported a number of cultural events both via the council and actively participating in the organisation, running and promotion of the events.

  4. Bob Taylor says:
    Admin Comment: Multiple comments using different names have been posted from this IP address

    The arts have a vital role to play in driving economic growth, and that local government is key to achieving this.
    http://www.local.gov.uk/web/guest/publications/-/journal_content/56/10180/3917456/PUBLICATION

    The arts help to attract and retain all types of large and small businesses, and contribute towards a national and global reputation for places. Businesses want to start-up or relocate in great places to live where their employees will enjoy a high quality of life.

    Festivals and events are good at bringing people together and ‘showing off the best of the place’, projecting a vibrant, alive, and happening image, beyond the simple allure of interesting bricks and mortar

    The arts define places. You cannot shape a place, regenerate a community or deliver sustainable growth through infrastructure planning alone. The arts are already a key part of the economic vitality of places, and the challenge is to continue to reflect this in the developing economic landscape.

    Festivals and events are good for local people, engendering local pride, sense of community and collective endeavour: in this, they closely mirror the qualities that successful destination brands

    To provide an opportunity for celebration, and a focus for, and expression of, collective effort by the local community

    To improve local quality of life. Of particular relevance to the visitor economy, and beyond their avowed passion for the
    arts, many festival directors cite a desire to improve
    local quality of life and put their city/town/village ‘on
    the map’ and to challenge negative perceptions where these exist

    • The arts help to attract and retain all types of large and small businesses, and contribute towards a national and global reputation for places. Businesses want to start-up or relocate in great places to live where their employees will enjoy a high quality of life.

      We’re talking about a four day event here, not a permanent arts or culture attraction. The £40k loss means £40k less to spend on services that would improve the quality of life for local residents.

      Festivals and events are good for local people, engendering local pride, sense of community and collective endeavour: in this, they closely mirror the qualities that successful destination brands

      Except it was priced out of the range of most local families. Telford is a low-wage area which is why we still have a strong manufacturing base in the borough. For the cost of taking a family to the concert alone you could feed said family for a week.

  5. Andrew Ridely says:
    Admin Comment: Multiple comments using different names have been posted from this IP address

    Have you seen this from the BBC

    Tourists going to concerts and festivals are boosting the UK economy by as much as £2.2 billion a year.

    Music tourism is also said to provide 24,000 jobs each year, a report by VisitBritain and UK Music shows.

    Spending by people from the UK and abroad was worth £1.3 billion last year.

    VisitBritain says nearly half of the average live music audience is made up of tourists, with visitors from abroad spending an average of £910 while attending festivals and £602 going to concerts.

    Domestic music tourists spent, on average, £396 while attending festivals and £87 going to concerts.

    VisitBritain chief executive Sandie Dawe said: “This report confirms that the UK’s music scene has significant international appeal and that music tourists spend lots of money and travel across the whole of Britain.

    “This will act as a catalyst for us all to ramp up our activity and forge better relationships with festival organisers, promoters, venues and producers to raise awareness of our amazing music scene across the world.”

    Jo Dipple, chief executive of industry body UK Music, which helped prepare the report, said: “It’s clear our music industry is doing a great job for the British economy, encouraging 6.5 million tourists who generated £2.2 billion last year

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/24496893

    • VisitBritain says nearly half of the average live music audience is made up of tourists, with visitors from abroad spending an average of £910 while attending festivals and £602 going to concerts.

      This is Telford Town Park, not the NEC or Wembley. It was headlined by McFly, not One Direction or Lady Gaga. It would be a challenge in itself for one person to spend £602 attending an open-air concert in Telford.

  6. Ok, so it’s pretty obvious that you’re both passionate campaigners for arts funding and that’s great because it’s always one of the first budgets to get cut when money is tight. However …

    Bob Taylor and Nancy Evans are the same person or at least in the same house, using the same internet connection. The paragraph at the end of the comment by “Bob Taylor” is copied from an email reply – you can tell because the lines are broken part way through sentences which most email clients do to make the text display in a tidy block. It’s not possible to tell where Bob/Nancy is because Sky Broadband (his/her ISP) always comes up as London. Andrew Ridley (or are Amanda Reynolds or Mike Jones the real person?) is in Telford but Matthew Hughes is in Leicester. Of course people outside of Telford & Wrekin can and will have an opinion on such things but it’s for residents of Telford & Wrekin (that’s real people Bob/Nancy & Andrew/Amanda/Mike) to decide whether their council should be spending their tax money on a loss-making concert.

    To summarise, there are only three real people responsible for six comments on two posts relating to this concert and the content of all but one is sourced from other people.

  7. Bob Taylor says:

    I voted UKIP at the last election, but following your comment posted here I will be voting for another party and am very angry at your suggestions posted here and will be writing formally to the national UKIP party over this issue and your response.

    There is no one else living at this address as I am a widower who is retired who believed you would do something to benefit Brookside.

    Yes I do believe in benefits of arts and culture especially for young people but I do see a real big hole in Brookside having worked there for over 20 years and want to know what you and your party are doing to bring in private and public investment for arts and culture into Brookside and what you are doing for our young people of Brookside to make a difference through the arts for our young people?

    Yes I do have sky broadband

    Bob Taylor is my real name and I do live in Telford despite your comments otherwise and unfortunately live on my own since my wife passed away of lung cancer two years ago.

    Your very angry
    Bob Taylor

    • Make sure you include this screenshot showing two comments from the same IP address 24 hours apart with different names. Sky Broadband manage their IP address allocations centrally and have a 60 minute lease so you would firstly have to have switched your router off for over an hour the day you made the first comment and then someone else in Telford on Sky Broadband would have had to have been allocated the same IP address as you from the central pool. The odds of this happening are absolutely phenomenal. You’ve probably got more chance of hitting the jackpot on the lottery and winning a bet on San Marino winning the World Cup and the Grand National being won by a Shetland pony.

      Bob Taylor/Nancy Evans

  8. Andrew Ridely says:

    Andrew Ridely here I live with my wife Kate in Sirchley and use Sky Broadband wifi hotspots on my Galaxy Tab so thats why I come up as Sky Broadband in London I am a Labour supporter who has seen how music can change lives at very little cost and belives we should be doing more in Telford and changing lives by bringing in BOTH public AND private investment for the arts which is where you can help us so that it isn’t all public money but lottery,business and private funding in these times of public sector cuts

    Why should T Live be only four days with the right funding from public, lottery, private and local business it can be made affordable for all and a regular festival with all the benefits to our local economy and working with our LEP lets together make it permanent feature and the social benefits it will bring

    I don’t know any Nancy or anyone called Bob or Mike or anyone in Leicester instead of trying to make me sound like I don’t exist which I do give us a plan for what YOU want to do for arts and culture publish it on your website and lets work together help us make the case to change our local community for the better and change local lives

    Yes SOME of my facts have come from other other goverment websites and offical goverment impact reports and have cut and pasted from them to make a point backed up with evidence

    Publish your ideas and a action plan for the arts you say your involved in events raise the profile of them make a bigger splash and get a sponsor for them to make them bigger and better get more young people involved in the arts and our local schools involved in the arts it’s part of your party’s policy after all

    The real life Andrew Ridely in the flesh from Sirchley

    • Interesting. This reply comes minutes after Bob Taylor/Nancy Evans replied denying all knowledge of his/her alter ego. The circumstances are, of course, exactly the same except Andrew/Amanda/Mike posted three times in three days instead of twice in two. Sky Broadband manage their IP address allocations centrally and have a 60 minute lease so you would firstly have to have switched your router off for over an hour the day you made the first comment and then someone else in Telford on Sky Broadband would have had to have been allocated the same IP address as you from the central pool. The odds of this happening are absolutely phenomenal. You’ve probably got more chance of hitting the jackpot on the lottery and winning a bet on San Marino winning the World Cup and the Grand National being won by a Shetland pony. For it to happen a third time in three days the odds are so remote as to be unworthy of even contemplating.

      Mike Jones/Amanda Reynolds/Andrew Ridley

  9. If there are any more fake comments here then complaints are going to be made to service providers (and that includes your mobile phone provider Andrew/Amanda/Mike). You’ve tried to get one over on us, you’ve been caught, now grow up and move on.

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